Magazine article Artforum International

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: Centre Pompidou

Magazine article Artforum International

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: Centre Pompidou

Article excerpt

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

CENTRE POMPIDOU

In 1977, a twelve-year-old Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster visited Marcel Duchamp's exhibition at the newly opened Centre Pompidou. Evoking this seminal experience at the threshold to her own Pompidou survey thirty-eight years later, Gonzalez-Foerster adhered a life-size transparent photograph of Duchamp's show to a street-facing glass wall and retrofitted the abutting exhibition space with elements of the museum's original decor. Inside this installation, Espace 71, 2015, viewers stand on period gray carpeting amid Michel Cadestin's President armchairs and look through ghostly images of Duchamp's Fountain, 1917/1964, and Large Glass, 1915-23, at the outside world. The eerie mise-en-scene (a collaboration with Philippe Parreno) merges past with present, confuses interior and exterior spaces, and conflates memory with reality. It is but one of many wormholes in Gonzalez-Foerster's time-traveling retrospective.

Though the works on view date from 1985 through 2015, the time frame of the exhibition extends well beyond these thirty years. The show's curator, Emma Lavigne--the director of Centre Pompidou Metz--bracketed instead the wide-ranging period evoked in the artist's work through the show's title, "Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: 1887-2058." In one sense, the oldest work is Splendide Hotel (annexe), 2015, a variation on Splendide Hotel, 2014, Gonzalez-Foerster's recent installation at Madrid's Palacio de Cristal, in which Thonet-style rocking chairs, an Oriental carpet, and a gramophone provided a fin-de-siecle ambiance in which to peruse catalogues of 1887 events such as the Palacio de Cristal's construction and the opening of the Hotel Splendide in Lugano, Switzerland. Meanwhile, several stories above, the artist's vision of the future can be seen on the Pompidou's fifth-floor terrace: Dublinesca, 2002, a foursome of blue and yellow metal bunk beds (a book set on each mattress-less frame) beside Alexander Calder's large stabile Nageoire (Fin), 1964, is a scaled-down version of Gonzalez-Foerster's 2008-2009 installation TH.2058, which envisages Tate Modern's Turbine Hall circa 2058 as a postapocalyptic bunker filled with metal beds and facsimiles of public sculptures by Calder. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.