Magazine article CRM Magazine

Social Customer Service: The Hype Gives Way to Practice: But the Model You Choose Will Depend on Who's Using It, and How

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Social Customer Service: The Hype Gives Way to Practice: But the Model You Choose Will Depend on Who's Using It, and How

Article excerpt

OVER THE past few years, video game giant Activision Publishing--publisher of the absurdly successful Call of Duty game franchise--has experienced a marked change in its customer service operations. Day to day, its customers still need help with the mechanics of game play and with understanding error codes. But those customers have increasingly shifted away from chat and voice channels and turned to social media to get support from the company. That trend has accelerated to the point where social media ranks as the company's most used agent-assisted channel.

Companies across all industries have given some thought to the importance of social customer service; the infamous "United Breaks Guitars" incident back in 2009, among other episodes, clearly showed social's ability to generate negative publicity. But customer service execs have started to explore the positive benefits of social customer service; it's no longer seen simply as a defensive posture from which to stem bad press.

Even though social customer service accounts for only a small percentage of overall customer service volumes today, the writing is on the wall--social service will soon be truly mainstream. For proof, look no further than the Millennials: According to Forrester data, more than half of U.S. adults ages 18 to 34 who regularly go online have reached out to a company on Twitter to receive customer service in the past year.

So if you want to bring social customer service into the mainstream flow of your customer support organization, where should you start? The social support tools themselves provide two very different models for work distribution. Understanding each model--and what and who it's suited for--will give you a big head start on turning social media from a fringe channel to one of your top tools for driving great experiences.

THE PULL MODEL: CONVENIENCE FOR SMALLER TEAMS

Social customer service started when marketing organizations began using social media as a broadcast medium and customers began responding with questions and concerns. These social marketing teams, especially early on, rarely numbered more than a handful of staffers. The social service products built to serve these teams make sense in a marketing milieu: The tools monitor social networks and--either through an automated workflow or with the assistance of an employee or team in a traffic cop role--place actionable posts in a work bin or queue. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.