Magazine article The American Prospect

Grace under Fire: Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards Is One of the Nation's Premier Political Strategists and Organizers-Exactly What the Cause of Reproductive Rights Needs Now More Than Ever

Magazine article The American Prospect

Grace under Fire: Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards Is One of the Nation's Premier Political Strategists and Organizers-Exactly What the Cause of Reproductive Rights Needs Now More Than Ever

Article excerpt

On a warm Tuesday morning in late September, Cecile Richards, the 58-year-old president and CEO of Planned Parenthood, went before Congress to defend her organization. A few months earlier, the Center for Medical Progress, an undercover anti-abortion group, had released a series of doctored videos that purported to show Planned Parenthood illegally profiting from the sale of fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood denied the accusations, but outrage spiraled furiously among conservatives.

Republican officials launched state and federal investigations, while presidential candidates and members of Congress called for defunding Planned Parenthood entirely, threatening to shut down the government if their demands were not met.

Riding this whirlwind of righteous anger, Republicans eagerly anticipated their confrontation with Richards. Yet when she came before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Republicans suddenly found Richards grilling them, not the other way around. "Mr. Chairman, you and I do disagree about whether women should have access to safe and legal abortion," she said, staring into the eyes of Jason Chaffetz, the Republican from Utah who chaired the hearing. "At Planned Parenthood, we believe that women should be able to make their own decision about their pregnancies and their futures--and the majority of Americans agree. We trust women to make these decisions in consultation with their families, their doctors, and their faith, and not by Congress."

A week later, Chaffetz admitted that after formally investigating Planned Parenthood, he and his colleagues had been unable to find any evidence of financial wrongdoing. Eight states that launched their own investigations have also failed to produce any smoking guns. The absence of evidence, however, hasn't deterred GOP-controlled state governments from attempting to cut funds for Planned Parenthood, or moderated Republicans' demonization of the organization.

These attacks, though, have only inspired Planned Parenthood's supporters to rally to its defense. Three days before Richards testified, a progressive coalition delivered a petition in support of Planned Parenthood to Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid and Senator Elizabeth Warren; it had more than 1.2 million signatures. On the day of Richards's testimony, hundreds of thousands of advocates across the country organized rallies and Internet campaigns to demonstrate solidarity, in what would be Planned Parenthood's first ever "National Pink Out Day."

In 2016, the battle over reproductive rights will almost surely grow more intense. The Supreme Court is set to rule on two major cases: one concerning contraception coverage, and the other on abortion access. The latter, both sides agree, may be the most consequential case for abortion rights since 1992, when the high court ruled that states could not impose an "undue burden" on women who wish to end a pregnancy. State legislatures, which enacted 288 abortion restrictions between 2011 and 2015, will no doubt continue to test the limits of what such "undue burdens" really mean.

2016 also marks the centennial anniversary of Planned Parenthood, an organization that has become the target of an anti-abortion movement that steadily grows more aggressive and violent. The FBI reported an increase in the number of arson attacks and vandalism incidents at abortion clinics in the wake of the Center for Medical Progress videos, and the president of the National Abortion Federation said abortion providers have seen "an unprecedented increase in hate speech and threats" since the videos were released. In late November, a man opened fire in a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs, injuring nine people, and killing three. After the shooting, the suspected gunman invoked the doctored videos, telling local authorities, "no more baby parts."

Richards, who has spent a decade at Planned Parenthood's helm, toils at ground zero of the culture wars being fought across the country. …

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