Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Young Professionals Need Fitness, Too

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Young Professionals Need Fitness, Too

Article excerpt

Young professionals are often on the front lines of providing health and wellness opportunities for the citizens in their communities. Many work in recreation facilities with immediate access to fitness equipment. And yet, young professionals, who often work evenings, weekends and odd hours, easily lose sight of their own personal fitness as they are creating opportunities for others. How can we care so much for the health and wellness of others and neglect our own? Shouldn't park and recreation professionals be a walking billboard for health and wellness?

As young professionals with nontraditional schedules, getting into a normal routine of physical activity is a little more difficult. I personally worked a late evening shift or a very early morning shift for three years and often found myself sleeping in or being tired at about 6 p.m. every night. With these hours, staying at work an extra hour, half hour, or even 15 minutes is the last thing you want to do (even though a free gym is footsteps away). Park and recreation professionals are committed to getting the community active and moving, but, we spend so much time working and helping others be active that we often forget about one person: ourselves!

Finding a balance between work and personal fitness, and helping others find that balance, has become a mission in my own life. In my role as a park and recreation professional and as the owner and head coach at Axle CrossFit in Las Vegas, Nevada, I have the daily job of motivating the everyday worker to stay active and healthy. I am not a fitness expert, and I do not have the secret to getting sixpack abs, but what I have found is a balance between a 15-hour workday and a fitness experience that I enjoy. You should be able to as well. Here are some tips for young professionals to get active and make health and wellness a part of their lives, not just in the lives of those they serve:

Make Fitness a Priority/Routine

One of the biggest mistakes people make is not making fitness a priority. This may not be breaking news to anyone, but if something is not a priority to you, then you will most likely not get it done. A routine can turn fitness from a chore to something you look forward to. …

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