Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Screen Time, Migraine Linked in Young Adults

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Screen Time, Migraine Linked in Young Adults

Article excerpt

FROM CEPHALALGIA

Electronic screens and young adults seem increasingly inseparable these days, but a study warned that too much time in front of such screens can lead to an increase in headaches and migraine in the young adult population.

"Previous studies have observed associations between screen time exposure and headaches" in 10to 12-year-olds (Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:128-33) and adolescents (BMC Public Health. 2010 Jun 9; 10:324) and low-back and shoulder pain in adolescents (Eur J Public Health. 2006 Oct;16[5]:536-41), wrote investigators led by Ilaria Montagni, Ph.D., of the University of Bordeaux (France). "This had led to speculation that the high amount of screen time exposure among students of higher-education institutions may be correlated with the high prevalence of headache and migraine observed in this population."

Dr. Montagni and her coinvestigators enrolled 4,927 individuals in France, all of whom were aged 18 years and older and part of the Internet-based Students Health Research Enterprise (i-Share) project cohort, which is an ongoing, prospective, population-based cohort study of students at French-speaking universities and higher-education institutions. The mean age of the students involved was 20.8 years, and 75.5% were female (Cephalalgia. 2015 Dec 2. doi: 10.1177/0333102415620286).

Subjects completed self-reported surveys on the average amount of time they spend in front of screens during five activities: computer or tablet work, playing video games on a computer/tablet, Internet surfing on a computer/tablet, watching videos on a computer/tablet, and using a smartphone. All questions were scored using a 0- to 5-point scale: 0 for never, 1 for less than 30 minutes, 2 for 30 minutes to 2 hours, 3 for 4-8 hours, and 5 for any time of 8 hours or more. Scores from the surveys were divided into quartiles of very low, low, high, and very high screen-time exposure. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.