Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Be Still and Know That I Am God

Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Be Still and Know That I Am God

Article excerpt

Like Jessica Mesman Griffith in this month's feature story ("The secret life of the American teenager," pages 12-17) one of the prevailing memories of my high school life is driving down a dark road at night. After an evening spent with friends or my high school boyfriend, I would leave myself an extra 30-40 minutes before my 11 p.m. curfew and take the "long way" home. I'd drive along the winding back roads of my little upstate New York town, alone in the darkness except for the deer and sometimes an escaped chicken. Sometimes I'd blast the radio and sing along, but I'd often find myself silent, just thinking.

During those years, driving was one of my only opportunities to be truly alone. Home was noisy and chaotic, with two younger siblings, a boisterous puppy, and a musician father. When I was out, I was at school, work, extracurricular activities, or with friends. There was someone else around every second of the day.

So I identified with the teenagers who Griffith spoke to about needing a place where they could sit with God. I, too, needed a space where I could figure out who I was and what I believed. I needed a space where I could work on becoming my true self--not the self my parents or teachers or friends wanted me to be. …

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