Magazine article USA TODAY

Dodging Deflategate Queries Proves Not a Problem for NFL's Top-Rated QB

Magazine article USA TODAY

Dodging Deflategate Queries Proves Not a Problem for NFL's Top-Rated QB

Article excerpt

Sometimes, saying "I don't know" may be the best way for sports stars and other celebrities to gain favor with the public when faced with tough questions. That is the key result from a case study involving Tom Brady, the 6'4", 225-pound star quarterback for the New England Patriots, and a news conference he gave concerning foe Deflategate scandal.

People actually felt more goojdwjll from Brady and thought he dodged questions less when he started his answers with "I don't know" "I, have no idea," foe study found.

The study appears in the International Journal of Sport Communication. Deflategate is foe name given to a controversy about whether foe Patriots deliberately used underinflated footballs to gain an advantage over the Indianapolis Colts in the National Football League's January 2015 American Football Conference championship game, won by the Pats.

On Jan. 22, 2015, Brady held a news conference to respond to the charges. His propensity to say "I don't know" and "I have no idea" to many of the questions was mocked by comedy shows, including "Saturday Night Live" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live," and even by the White House press secretary.

While the study findings initially may seem surprising, David Clementson, author of the study and doctoral student in communication at Ohio State University, Columbus, indicates they make intuitive sense. …

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