Magazine article The New American

Suckish Socialism: Though American Students Are Being Sold by Their Teachers on Socialism, Analysis of the Outcomes of Socialism Tells a Story of Utter Failure, a Tale Told to Readers in a New Book

Magazine article The New American

Suckish Socialism: Though American Students Are Being Sold by Their Teachers on Socialism, Analysis of the Outcomes of Socialism Tells a Story of Utter Failure, a Tale Told to Readers in a New Book

Article excerpt

The Problem With Socialism, by Thomas J. DiLorenzo, Washington, D.C.: Regnery Publishing, 2016, 226 pages, hardcover.

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If the last 100 years of human history were not enough to convince you that socialism is evil and deadly, Thomas DiLorenzo's new book will definitely do the trick. From debunking the theories and narratives that underpin socialism and socialist programs, to outlining a powerful case for freedom and free markets, The Problem With Socialism can serve as an excellent resource to educate Americans. If the information contained within the book were to become widely and generally known, socialism would undoubtedly die a much-deserved death.

Indeed, the book deals a devastating blow to socialism--its theories, justifications, rationalizations, history, and more. Even the way DiLorenzo defines socialism --the imposition of a single, centralized plan over the lives of individuals who otherwise would have made their own plans for their lives--provides much food for thought. When socialism is defined in this more honest way, it becomes much harder for socialist ideologues to get away with using empty and deceptive slogans about "equality" and the "workers." And the evil of socialism does not stop there. As the book observes on more than one occasion, these grandiose Utopian plans are imposed at the barrel of a gun, using "threats, intimidation, and violence."

Despite its relatively few pages and words, or perhaps because of it, The Problem With Socialism does an excellent job of hitting many of the key points in a simple way, a way that even a child could under stand. For example, it explains the theoretical problems with socialism, but it also includes an abundance of historical and contemporary examples showing how and why socialism is always and everywhere a disaster--including a chart showing the gargantuan body counts (60 million dead for China) associated with various murderous socialist regimes over the last century. The book also addresses human nature, and how, under socialist systems, the most ruthless savages have a tendency to rise to the top, perhaps helping to explain the staggering death toll of socialism.

Unfortunately, though, while facts, logic, history, and reality all conclusively show socialism to be a horrifying plague upon mankind, DiLorenzo's book starts off by pointing out that it is becoming increasingly popular among young Americans. The government's schools, addressed in a separate chapter, are no doubt one of the primary explanations for that.

The often brief and simple but very effective explanations of the rationale behind supporting markets are wonderful. "In the private sector, profits reveal what value a business has contributed to the economy or to society," writes DiLorenzo. "For instance, if a business takes $10,000 worth of resources and creates products for which people pay $100,000, then it has created $90,000 worth of value to society. Government enterprises, by contrast, can actually destroy value by using resources in a less than efficient or profitable way. Indeed, the worse a government agency performs, the more money it can claim from a legislature, city council, or county commission." Short and to the point.

Of course, no book purporting to expose the problems of socialism would be complete without a thorough debunking of the pervasive myths surrounding what is alleged by socialists to be successful Scandinavian socialism. DiLorenzo does a fantastic job here, again, in addition to exposing the socialist healthcare model that is becoming increasingly prevalent elsewhere in the West.

One of the most fascinating sections of the book deals with how socialism causes pollution and how, if free markets with strong property rights were allowed to flourish, the scourge could be easily kept in check. The shocking pollution found behind the Iron Curtain is an ongoing testament to the environmental horrors associated with socialism. …

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