Magazine article CRM Magazine

Advocate Marketing Has Four Personality Types: Knowing Where Customers Fall Can Improve Contacts with Them and Their Followers

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Advocate Marketing Has Four Personality Types: Knowing Where Customers Fall Can Improve Contacts with Them and Their Followers

Article excerpt

Customer advocacy has rich--and largely untapped--potential, according to a recent Forrester report. To help marketers harness customers' ability to promote brands, the report identifies four personality types they should consider while designing their advocacy programs.

While many companies focus on technology to establish their advocate marketing programs, they should instead be putting customer experience first, the study suggests. Moreover, focusing on customer desire--as opposed to company wants, such as case studies, testimonials, and referrals--can help build relationships with customers who are potential brand advocates, the report notes.

Educators are the first advocate personality type identified by the study. These people are enthusiastic, eager to help others, and have a good understanding of the products and services offered. These qualities make educators best suited for content creation, sharing content on social media, and community participation.

"When somebody is satisfied and happy with the way that your products and services are working for them, they want to tell other people about it. But the educators also have that teaching gene. [They] are helpers, they want others to be successful, and they do it because it makes them intrinsically feel good," says Laura Ramos, vice president and principal analyst serving B2B marketing professionals at Forrester and principal author of the study.

Validators are the second advocate personality type. They tend to be credible, well-spoken, and fair in their evaluations. Furthermore, they are often willing to go on record on behalf of a company and to make introductions. These people are good resources for sales references, internal and external referrals, case studies, and product feedback.

"[Like educators], validators are also happy to share stories and things like that, but they don't really feel that they're getting anything out of it intrinsically," Ramos clarifies. "They're also the kind that, when they're happy, they're going to be your best supporters, but when they're unhappy, they could be your biggest critics. …

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