Magazine article Computers in Libraries

Content in Motion

Magazine article Computers in Libraries

Content in Motion

Article excerpt

It seems as if everything on the web these days hinges on video. News. Weather. Sports. Politics. Instructional clips on YouTube. Comedic moments on Facebook. Empowered by our devices, we now have the ability to produce and consume video on-the-fly, and it seems we just can't get enough.

At Information Today, Inc., in addition to covering libtech, we have been at the forefront of the digital video movement with our Streaming Media magazine, website, and conferences (see streamingmedia.com). But this issue marks the first time I have attempted to devote an issue of CIL to the subject.

In these pages, with many thanks to deg farrelly--he shouldn't be so modest in not capitalizing the initial letters of his name--you'll find his excellent review of the top providers of streaming video content for library patrons, along with his notes on the various licensing models that are governing the flow of this highly desired format.

In today's libraries, the demand for streaming video is not limited to the content you can bring in, but it may also involve the content that you already have. Christopher Lewis and Molly Hubbs present the results of their efforts at American University to digitize and make available a collection of VHS tapes that, in some cases, represents the institution's own legacy content--as well as commercial tapes that are still in high demand, but are disintegrating and can't be replaced.

Librarians are increasingly the creators of video and other visual content. …

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