Magazine article Dance Magazine

Dance in the Age of Black Lives Matter: Continuing the Long Legacy of Activism in Our Field, Today's Artists Are Using Dance to Confront Racism

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Dance in the Age of Black Lives Matter: Continuing the Long Legacy of Activism in Our Field, Today's Artists Are Using Dance to Confront Racism

Article excerpt

Dance performances often encourage audiences to escape reality. But on July 7, dance forced the audience at the Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival to face it. During a performance of And Still You Must Swing, tap dancers Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards and Derick K. Grant stopped mid-show, near tears, and acknowledged the killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. In the previous 72 hours, Sterling and Castile had become the latest in a string of black men killed by police officers. At a candid post-performance conversation, fellow dancer Jason Samuels Smith told the audience, "These are our extended family members, our cousins, our uncles, our brothers, our fathers ... You feel that pain." The evening also included guest artist Camille A. Brown performing the buzzard lope, a ritual that was once danced by slaves. "It was extremely hard," she says, but "understanding the power of movement rooted in the African-American experience made me feel proud of the history that lives in our bodies."

Pride and pain have always been intertwined for black dancers and choreographers in America. Dance has sometimes eloquently expressed this dichotomy. It has also at times reflected the country's indifference to ongoing racial violence and discrimination, allowing discourse to lean on the wobbly pillar of "diversity" instead. But as the Black Lives Matter movement has returned race to the center of the national debate, it has galvanized some artists of color and challenged white dance a audiences to confront their discomfort with racial issues.

The visibility of Black Lives Matter paired with the echo chamber of social media and the heightened debate of an election year--particularly one that was something of a referendum on the nation's first black president--can make this moment feel unique. In some ways it is, simply because, as Hope Boykin, a longtime dancer with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, explains, "We're present in it, we feel it." Brown adds, "The current sociopolitical climate makes this work even more relevant to audiences."

But both Boykin and Brown quickly add that using dance to respond to racial issues is not new. "Mr. Ailey founded his company in 1958 in the middle of the Civil Rights movement, when incredible speeches were being made, while people were marching across bridges, while people were being beaten and hosed down and had food thrown at them at lunch counters," says Boykin. Brown points to a number of her contemporaries and predecessors who have documented racism and represented the black experience over decades, including Ronald K. Brown, Nora Chipaumire, Marlies Yearby, Eleo Pomare, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar. [See "Before #BlackLivesMatter: A Timeline, " page 43.]

Whether in the past or today, addressing this contentious national issue can be a creatively daunting task. But transposing the anger, pain and sadness of the outside world onto the body, and then onto the stage, is a burden that dance has embraced. "That's the very foundation of modern dance and this company, to address the issues of the day," says Ailey's artistic director Robert Battle. The company's 2016 winter season at New York City Center illustrates its ongoing contribution to the dialogue on race. Vintage examples include the first piece Ailey made for his company, Blues Suite, a vibrant portrait of a community nearly absent from dance stages at the time, and his Masekela Langage, a 1969 work about apartheid in South Africa. Newer works include Rennie Harris' formidable Exodus from 2015, which includes haunting images of violence in the streets, and Untitled America, by Kyle Abraham, an intimate depiction of the effects of mass incarceration on black American families. Boykin's new work, r-Evolution, Dream, is inspired by the speeches and sermons of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. "I named it r-Evolution with a little 'r,' "she says, "because the evolution is more important than the revolt, to me."

Although Boykin's goal is to connect with audiences, rather than alienate them, it doesn't mean she is offering easy reassurances. …

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