Magazine article American Forests

Blisters, Beetles and British Columbia: Global ReLeaf in Canada

Magazine article American Forests

Blisters, Beetles and British Columbia: Global ReLeaf in Canada

Article excerpt

LILLOOET, A TOWN roughly 150 miles north of Vancouver, is one of the oldest inhabited areas on the continent. People have lived in the region for several thousand years. But, some of the local whitebark pines have been alive for that long.

The whitebark pine is one of the most rugged trees on the planet, surviving in extreme altitudes and conditions. It sets the treeline for many mountains across western North America, and the ecosystem it cultivates is responsible for the survival of many high-altitude species. Grizzly bears, in particular, eat the highly nutritious seeds of the whitebark pine. Unfortunately, despite its tenacity, the whitebark pine wasn't ready for the effect of human intervention on its habitat.

The whitebark pine is currently being eradicated by two natural predators that have been unnaturally empowered by human impact. An invasive species, blister rust, made its way to the Americas on the backs of seedlings grown in European nurseries, and the whitebark pine has not adapted to resist the disease. It's not uncommon to find groves in Canada with infection rates as severe as 80 to 90 percent.

On the other hand, mountain pine beetles are native to the Americas, but increasing temperatures have allowed them to both survive at much higher altitudes and reproduce exponentially faster. Some pines, like the lodgepole pine, can inherit beetle-resistant traits, but since the whitebark pine exists high above the historic range of mountain pine beetles, it has no natural defenses against them. More than 40 million acres of forest in British Columbia are affected by these beetles.

The importance of the whitebark pine cannot be overstated. More than just a keystone species, it is an ecosystem stabilizer. …

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