Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

New Russia, Old Values: Twenty-Five Years after the Demise of the Soviet Union, Russia Is Consumed by an Insatiable Desire for Recognition as the Equal of America

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

New Russia, Old Values: Twenty-Five Years after the Demise of the Soviet Union, Russia Is Consumed by an Insatiable Desire for Recognition as the Equal of America

Article excerpt

President Trump meets President Putin. It's the most eagerly awaited encounter in world politics. Will The Donald thaw the New Cold War? Or will he be trumped by "Vlad"--selling out the West, not to mention Ukraine and Syria?

The Donald v Vlad face-off comes at a sensitive moment for the Kremlin, 25 years after the demise of the USSR on Christmas Day 1991 and just before the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Were the heady hopes at the end of the Cold War about a new world order mere illusions? Was Mikhail Gorbachev an aberration? Or is Putin rowing against the tide of post-Cold War history? How did we end up in the mess we're in today?

These are some of the questions that should be explored in Trump's briefing book. He needs to get to grips with not only Putin, but also Russia.

Today President George H W Bush's slogan "new world order" sounds utopian; even more so the pundit Francis Fukuyama's catchphrase "the end of history". But we need to remember just how remarkable that moment in world affairs was. The big issues of the Cold War had been negotiated peacefully between international leaders. First, the reduction of superpower nuclear arsenals, agreed in the Washington treaty of 1987: this defused Cold War tensions and the fears of a possible third world war. Then the 1989 revolutions across eastern Europe, which had to be managed especially when national boundaries were at stake. Here the German case was acutely sensitive because the Iron Curtain had split the nation into two rival states. By the time Germany unified in October 1990, the map of Europe had been fundamentally redrawn.

All this was accomplished in a spirit of co-operation--very different from other big shifts in European history such as 1815, 1871,1918 and 1945, when great change had come about through great wars. Amid such excitement, it wasn't surprising that people spoke of a new dawn. This was exemplified by the unprecedented working partnership between the US and the USSR during the First Gulf War in the winter of 1990-91 to reverse Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait. Bush and Gorbachev agreed that they shared a set of "democratic" and "universal" values, rooted in international law and in co-operation within the United Nations.

The new order of course assumed the continued existence of the Soviet Union. Despite the USSR's growing economic and political problems, no one anticipated its free fall in the second half of 1991. First came the August coup, an attempt by a group of anti-Gorbachev communist hardliners to take control of the Union. Their failed putsch fatally undermined Gorbachev's authority as Soviet leader and built up Boris Yeltsin as the democratic president of a Russian republic that was now bankrolling the USSR. Then followed the independence declarations of the Baltic states--Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania--and crucially Ukraine, which precipitated the complete unravelling of the Union. And so, on Christmas Day 1991, Gorbachev became history, and with him the whole Soviet era. It seemed like the final curtain on a drama that had opened in Petrograd in 1917. A grandiose project of forced modernisation and empire-building pursued at huge human and economic cost had imploded. The satellites in eastern Europe had gone their own way and so had the rimlands of historic Russia, from central Asia through Ukraine to the Baltic Sea. What remained was a rump state, the Russian Federation.

Despite all the rhetoric about a new world order, no new structures were created for Europe itself. Instead, over the next 15 years, the old Western institutions from the Cold War (the Atlantic Alliance and the European Union) were enlarged to embrace eastern Europe. By 2004, with the inclusion of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, Nato and the EU reached the borders of Russia, less than too miles from St Petersburg.

Initially the West's eastward expansion wasn't a big problem. The Kremlin did not feel threatened by the EU because that was seen as a political-economic project. …

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