Magazine article Nutrition Action Healthletter

Fish Oil & Asthma

Magazine article Nutrition Action Healthletter

Fish Oil & Asthma

Article excerpt

One in five young children have asthma or wheezing. Fish oil may cut the risk in those whose mothers eat little or no fatty fish.

Danish researchers randomly assigned roughly 700 women in their 24th week of pregnancy to take either fish oil (1,320 milligrams of EPA and 900 mg of DHA) or a placebo every day until a week after their children were born. Then the scientists followed the children for five years.

Those whose mothers were given fish oil had a 31 percent lower risk of asthma or persistent wheezing. Further analyses showed that fish oil only helped the children of mothers who started the study with low blood levels of EPA and DHA. Fish oil cut their risk of asthma or persistent wheezing by 54 percent.

The children of the fish oil takers also had a 25 percent lower risk of lower respiratory tract infections (bronchiolitis or pneumonia)--but no lower risk of eczema, allergic sensitization, or asthma exacerbations--than the children of the placebo takers. …

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