Magazine article Anglican Journal

Love and Politics

Magazine article Anglican Journal

Love and Politics

Article excerpt

IT IS A good time to remind ourselves of the politics of Jesus. In a fragmented time, everyone seeming to be at odds with everyone else, it might even be considered urgent. Urgent, yes, and difficult, for the demand of the politics of Jesus is something that is rarely spoken of these days. His demand is that we practise a politics of love.

It may often seem impractical, but Jesus is absolute in the command to love. There is no indication that love is optional, or that in some situations, it is unnecessary or unwise. Though we are to be as wise as serpents and innocent as doves--meaning that we are to be careful, realistic and smart in our dealings with others--this is not an out from the call to love.

The first aspect of the politics of love is to be loving in all situations, even and especially in conflict. This means, at a minimum, to be kind and respectful in conflict, giving opponents the benefit of the doubt in disagreement and being humble about the merits of our own opinion. Further, we are to be willing to bear the pain of others, even those with whom we are in conflict, being fast to forgive and slow to blame.

The second aspect of Jesus' politics of love, in a way that might appear to contradict the first, is that love is to resist evil. We are to love, resolutely, but also to, in love, stand for the right against wrong. Love sometimes says no, sometimes bears the pain of truth in difficult situations. Like Jesus, we must be willing to confront wrongdoing.

The third aspect of Jesus' politics of love is nonviolence. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.