Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Robots Are Already Here: For Centuries, We Have Built Replacements for Ourselves

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Robots Are Already Here: For Centuries, We Have Built Replacements for Ourselves

Article excerpt

There were no fireworks to dazzle the crowd lining the streets of Alexandria to celebrate Cleopatra's triumphant return to the city in 47BC. Rather, there was a four-and-a-half-metre-tall robotic effigy of the queen, which squirted milk from mechanical bosoms on to the heads of onlookers. Cleopatra, so the figure was meant to symbolise, was a mother to her people.

It turns out that robots go back a long way. At the "Robots" exhibition now on at the Science Museum in London, a clockwork monk from 1560 walks across a table while raising a rosary and crucifix, its lips murmuring in devotion. It is just one of more than 100 exhibits, drawn from humankind's half-millennium-long obsession with creating mechanical tools to serve us.

"We defined a robot as a machine which looks lifelike, or behaves in lifelike ways," Ben Russell, the lead curator of the exhibition, told me. This definition extends beyond the mechanisms of the body to include those of the mind. This accounts for the inclusion of robots such as "Cog", a mash-up of screws, motors and scrap metal that is, the accompanying blurb assures visitors, able to learn about the world by poking at colourful toys, "like a giant metal baby".

The exhibits show that there has long existed in our species a deep desire to rebuild ourselves from scratch. That impulse to understand and replicate the systems of the body can be seen in some of the earliest surviving examples of robotics. In the 16th century, the Catholic Church commissioned some of the first anthropomorphic mechanical machines, suggesting that the human body had clockwork-like properties. Models of Jesus bled and automatons of Satan roared.

Robots have never been mere anatomical models, however. In the modern era, they are typically employed to work on the so-called 4D tasks: those that are dull, dumb, dirty, or dangerous. A few, such as Elektro, a robot built in Ohio in the late 1930s, which could smoke a cigarette and blow up balloons, were showmen. Elektro toured the US in 1950 and had a cameo in an adult movie, playing a mechanical fortuneteller picking lottery numbers and racehorses.

Nevertheless, the idea of work is fundamental to the term "robot". Karel Capek's 1920s science-fiction play RUR, credited with introducing the word to the English language, depicts a cyborg labour force that rebels against its human masters. The Czech word robota means "forced labour". It is derived from rab, which means "slave".

This exhibition has proved timely. A few weeks before it opened in February, a European Parliament commission demanded that a set of regulations be drawn up to govern the use and creation of robots. In early January, Reid Hoffman and Pierre Omidyar, the founders of Linkedln and eBay respectively, contributed $iom each to a fund intended to prevent the development of artificial intelligence applications that could harm society. …

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