Magazine article Addiction Professional

Helping Patients Remain in Treatment Supports Positive Long-Term Outcomes

Magazine article Addiction Professional

Helping Patients Remain in Treatment Supports Positive Long-Term Outcomes

Article excerpt

Length of stay in substance abuse treatment is a predictor of treatment outcomes, with longer stays associated with lower relapse and recidivism.

Foundations Recovery Network (FRN) facilities recognize the importance of remaining in treatment in order to achieve the best possible long-term outcomes. For addiction treatment, most patients require a treatment stay ranging from 28 to 90 days in a residential facility to work through both the physical and emotional changes that sobriety requires. It is highly recommended that patients stay in treatment and participate fully for the entire prescribed amount of time.

A study was recently conducted using data collected from patients attending treatment at FRN facilities. Through analysis of patient data, FRN was able to identify important factors which allow for early identification of patients "at risk" for leaving treatment prior to completion.

There are also numerous diagnostic patient factors that have been shown to indicate an increased likelihood of ACA discharge. Factors that have been identified over a range of time and in a range of facilities and hospitals, such as comorbid drug use, are probably constant factors. Other factors, however, such as marital status, age, and ethnicity, tend to depend on the historical, social, and geographical context of the studies that identified them. Patient factors can also interact with provider factors.

Data from the study conducted by FRN was analyzed to determine the predictive value of each question by the patient's answer to the question. Analysis against actual patient discharge data revealed that several questions from the initial interview were strongly associated with patients leaving treatment ACA. …

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