Magazine article Opera Canada

Aaron Gervais

Magazine article Opera Canada

Aaron Gervais

Article excerpt

It took about 10 years due to the vagaries of opera funding, but Aaron Gervais's first full-length opera finally has its world premiere this spring. He met librettist Colleen Murphy in one of Toronto-based Tapestry Opera's LibLab collaborations and immediately knew they wanted to work together on a story of a woman caught in a web of international sex trafficking. Fast forward through workshopping, fundraising, planning, a change of leadership at Tapestry and a casting change or two, and Oksana G, scored for an orchestra of 18, three principal singers and a dozen secondary roles, will bring Tapestry's season to a resounding close in May.

From early days Gervais developed an "in-depth dramaturgic back-and-forth" with Murphy that made it easier for him to understand the characters and write them in music. "The relationship with the librettist is extremely important and I think that's something a lot of composers don't take seriously enough," he says. "But I've learned so much, and the piece is so much better from Colleen's contribution." A lot of the librettist-composer collaboration happens on the deeply technical side of things--what kinds of vowels and consonants can be used on the key words: "If you're going to land on a specific note, it has to come through, both in terms of text and emotions."

Additional challenges comes from using four languages. Oksana G is in English, Russian, Ukrainian and Italian--more complicated, but more authentic to the story than an all-English libretto. Each language, Gervais realized, comes with its own musicality. "This changed the kind of lines I wrote for the singers. Even in Russian and Ukrainian, which are similar, the placement of the vowels is somewhat different and a line that worked well in Ukrainian may seem awkward in Russian, so you'd have to change."

Earlier in his career, as a young composer eager to expand his horizons, Gervais took singing lessons for a year. One session he remembers as paradigm-changing: he came well prepared and sang everything correctly, yet the teacher interrupted him and told him it wasn't good. '"But I did everything correctly,' I protested. 'None of that stuff matters,' she said. 'It's about the emotion of the character, and the phrasing.' This opened my eyes to how different singing is, and how dynamic it can be. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.