Magazine article Artforum International

Elodie Seguin: Galerie Jocelyn Wolff

Magazine article Artforum International

Elodie Seguin: Galerie Jocelyn Wolff

Article excerpt

Elodie Seguin

GALERIE JOCELYN WOLFF

Despite being an outlier in many ways, Peinture cherche le mur A (Painting Looking for the Wall A) (all works 2017), a small painting of a simplified orange flashlight, fittingly illuminated Elodie Seguin's usually less straightforward explorations of form, color, and texture. The cylindrical orange and red shaft emitting a conical gray-white beam--the most overtly representational element in the artist's recent exhibition "Peinture sculpture peinture"--encouraged viewers to seek out figuration and symbolism in other works on view, which might otherwise be mistaken as exemplars of pure Minimalism.

Take, for instance, a series titled "Resistance." At first glance these carefully considered, meticulously crafted geometric studies look to be the love children of John McLaughlin's hard-edge rectangle paintings and Donald Judd's neat Plexiglas boxes. Here Seguin uses similar materials (wood, pale-blue Plexiglas, polyurethane paint) to examine a single form--an elongated rectangle with short, thin bars jutting from its right and left sides--across different permutations of color and material.

The foundation for each Resistance is a roughly fifteen-by-thirty-seven-inch wooden panel into which the artist hand-carved the recurrent rectangle-with-appendages that--as the series title might remind those who may not remember diagramming circuits in junior high school--is the symbol for electrical resistance. From there, Seguin subtly varies her paint colors as well as the shape and placement of the Plexiglas used in three of the four "Resistance" works to create a series that resists traditional painterly notions of foreground and background, subject and frame, as well as two-dimensionality. In some cases, the Plexiglas creates a flat, shiny surface that effectively frames the subject (Resistance 4), while in others the plastic sheet helps to define, or even becomes part of, the resistance symbol--either as an inlay (Resistance 5) or an overlay (Resistance 3). …

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