Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

If Only I Could Wangle a Job in the John Lewis Menswear Department I'd Get to Say, "Suits You, Sir"

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

If Only I Could Wangle a Job in the John Lewis Menswear Department I'd Get to Say, "Suits You, Sir"

Article excerpt

So now that I have made the news public that I am even deeper in the soup than I was when I started this column, various people--in fact, a far greater number than I had dared hope would--have expressed their support. Most notable, as far as I can tell, was Philip Pullman's. That was decent of him. But the good wishes of people less in the public eye are just as warming to the heart.

Meanwhile, the question is still nagging away at me: what are you going to do now? This was the question my mother's sisters would always ask her when a show she was in closed, and my gig might have been running for almost as long as The Mousetrap but hitherto the parallels with entertainment had eluded me.

"That's show business," she said to me, and for some reason that, too, is a useful comment. (I once saw a picture of a fairly well-known writer for page and screen dressed up, for a fancy-dress party, as a hot dog. The caption ran: "What? And give up show business?")

Anyway, the funds dwindle, although I am busy enough to find that time does not weigh too heavily on my hands. The problem is that this work has either already been paid for or else is some way off being paid for, if ever, and there is little fat in the bank account. So I am intrigued when word reaches me, via the Estranged Wife, that another family member, who perhaps would prefer not to be identified, suggests that I retrain as a member of the shopfloor staff in the menswear department of John Lewis.

At first I thought something had gone wrong with my hearing. But the E W continued. The person who had made the suggestion had gone on to say that I was fairly dapper, could talk posh, and had the bearing, when it suited me, of a gentleman.

I have now thought rather a lot about this idea and I must admit that it has enormous appeal. I can just see myself. "Not the checked jacket, sir. It does not become, sir. May I suggest the heather-mixture with the faint red stripe?" In the hallowed portals of Jean Louis (to be said in a French accent), as I have learned to call it, my silver locks would add an air of gravitas, instead of being a sign of superannuation, and an invitation to scorn. I would also get an enormous amount of amusement from saying "Walk this way" and "Suits you, sir". …

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