Magazine article CRM Magazine

With Customer Experience, More Is More: In Today's Marketplace, Companies Should Make Things Harder on Themselves, Not Their Customers

Magazine article CRM Magazine

With Customer Experience, More Is More: In Today's Marketplace, Companies Should Make Things Harder on Themselves, Not Their Customers

Article excerpt

By and large, businesses understand that investing in customer relationships has the potential to yield significant returns, but still, many fail to set their priorities accordingly. Hindered by concerns about shareholders and earnings statements, companies too often place customer experience lower on their to-do lists. In her new book, More Is More, author Blake Morgan advocates following the lead of organizations like JPMorgan Chase, whose CEO, Jamie Dimon, went on record as saying that he ignores quarterly profits and pays attention instead to customer feedback. Associate Editor Oren Smilansky interviewed Morgan to hear learn how short-term efforts can lead to long-term benefits.

CRM magazine: What is the top mistake you see companies make with customer experience?

Blake Morgan: The number-one issue is that executives have no clue what the customer experience actually is. If they did, they probably wouldn't even shop with their own company. It's important for CEOs to understand the customer experience, to know what it feels like to be a customer--to be maniacal about the customer experience. [Amazon CEO] Jeff Bezos and his executive team spend time in the call center every year. If you call Amazon customer service, you might speak to Jeff himself. This is a company that clearly cares about every step of the customer journey and wants to know it very well.

You write that a CEO's worst nightmare should be "the 95 percent of unhappy customers who don't complain" to them. Why?

I have an 8-month-old baby, and this week I got a feedback survey in the mail with my doctor's face on it, the pediatrician, and it was three pages long. This is a major hospital, one of the biggest in the country. They expect me to sit and fill out a three-page survey and send it back via snail mail? No way. I have a business, a baby; I don't have time. Companies are still relying on customers to fix their problems rather than finding out what their customer experience actually is. If you do want feedback from your customers, a yes-or-no question is really what you should do--like Net Promoter Score. After a transaction, send the customer a one-question email, or however you're sending that form, asking, would you recommend us? …

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