Magazine article Talent Development

Sharon Wingron

Magazine article Talent Development

Sharon Wingron

Article excerpt

President, Wings of Success LLC Kansas City, Missouri

Sharon Wingron calls herself "your PEOPLE development partner," and carries that mantra to her everyday practice. She is certified in Everything DiSC and several other personality assessments. Her expertise ranges from behavioral styles to leadership development and performance. Wingron also presents at Association for Talent Development conferences as well as facilitates the ATD Master Trainer Program and courses for the association's Essentials Series.

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WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE IS MOST CHALLENGING FOR THE LEARNING PROFESSION AND THE VUCA WORLD?

It's a two-sided sword. While I love continuous improvement, what's most challenging is keeping up. We are growing and changing rapidly in so many aspects of our profession, matching the pace of general workplace evolution and the shrinking stage of the global environment. It's challenging to provide best-fit solutions to meet the needs of a given situation because there are so many dynamics. And, even more importantly, it's a challenge to be afforded the time to do a proper analysis to determine the root causes of the challenge before creating a solution.

I think it's crucial that talent development professionals develop systems thinking and see how all the pieces fit together. That's one of the reasons I love the ATD Competency Model and was an early adopter [pilot pioneer] of the CPLP [Certified Professional in Learning and Performance] credential. As learning professionals, we need to develop and implement whole systems solutions that support performance and organizational results. We need to influence all affected organizational stakeholders to discourage sub-optimization.

APART FROM TECHNOLOGY, WHAT HAS STRUCK YOU IN TERMS OF CHANGES IN TALENT DEVELOPMENT IN THE PAST FIVE OR 10 YEARS?

Definitely how the profession looks at brain science and how we can apply it in our work. We've had multiple theories (behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism-all the isms, as Ferris Bueller would say) influence our work through the years. And those provided a solid foundation. Now we're at a point where we're either validating or invalidating those original theories. It's very exciting. For example, learning styles. There are some people who live and die by them, and yet the research shows, "well, not so much. …

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