Magazine article CRM Magazine

Marketers' Roles Are Changing with the Times; as Consumers Become More Aware, Marketing Needs to Tap into Both Sides of the Brain

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Marketers' Roles Are Changing with the Times; as Consumers Become More Aware, Marketing Needs to Tap into Both Sides of the Brain

Article excerpt

Where marketing was once an art form driven by creativity, instinct, and intuition, modern day marketing is a marriage of art and science that brings together right-brain and left-brain activities for new and improved outcomes, a top IBM executive told attendees at this year's DMA &Then conference in New Orleans in early October.

"Once we could quantify almost nothing, and now almost everything is quantifiable, allowing us to drive outcomes at an unprecedented rate," said Michelle Peluso, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at IBM, during the conference's opening keynote. "We have a much more exciting and influential seat at the table than we've ever had, and that's an honor and a privilege."

But now with that seat secured, marketers need to clarify their roles, she continued.

"We don't want to be advertisers; we want to be storytellers that can engage our customers in meaningful relationships. We don't want to be messaging experts; we want to drive outcomes for the business. We certainly don't want to be just the voice of the customer; we want to compel customers to take action to build relationships and loyalty with the companies we represent."

To do that, marketers can no longer afford to be purely siloed and discipline-driven, according to Peluso. "Our customers are buying stories and investing in brands where they have authentic relationships, so how we show up in the market really matters," she said.

Following that same theme, Alan Schulman, managing director of brand and creative content at Deloitte Digital, said marketing is less about persuasion and more about knowledge proficiency.

Data, once thought of as entirely foreign to creative people, is undergoing a change. "It's fair to say that the pendulum has swung to the side of the science of marketing these days rather than the art of persuasion. …

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