Magazine article USA TODAY

Noteworthy

Magazine article USA TODAY

Noteworthy

Article excerpt

Youth spend less time in their neighborhoods if area residents have a high fear of crime, maintains a study from Ohio State University, Columbus, that used smartphones to track kids' whereabouts. Researchers found that adolescents spent, on average, more than an hour less each day in their neighborhoods if residents there were very fearful, compared to kids from areas perceived as being safer. Higher fear of crime was linked to high-poverty neighborhoods, indicates lead author Christopher Browning, professor of sociology.

Here is something both you and your boss can agree on: workplace teams are better when they include your friends, suggests a meta-analysis published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Researchers analyzed the results of 26 studies and found that teams composed of friends performed better on certain tasks than groups of acquaintances or strangers. Teams with friends particularly were effective when the groups were larger and their focus was on maximizing output.

If you were fortunate enough to witness the total solar eclipse earlier this year, you might have noticed something surprising: it was dark as night, yet people and objects were easier to see than on a typical moonless night. A possible biological explanation is the presence of a protein in the retina known as a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor, which is in abundance on sunny days, and enhances the ability to see details and edges of objects. At night, it disappears. However, that process normally is gradual. When the eclipse took viewers from brightness to darkness in minutes, the GABA receptor still would have been present on those cells in their eyes, relates research published in Current Biology.

Workers who likely were exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico experienced a range of health symptoms--including coughing, wheezing, tightness in the chest, and burning in the eyes, nose, throat, or lungs--reports a study in Environmental Health Perspectives. …

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