Magazine article Gramophone

Art of Gioconda De Vito

Magazine article Gramophone

Art of Gioconda De Vito

Article excerpt

The Italian-British violinist Gioconda de Vito is the subject of another admirable Scribendum collection--though again, there are no booklet notes. Of particular interest are three recordings of the Brahms Violin Concerto, under Paul van Kempen in Berlin in 1941, Wilhelm Furtwangler in Turin in 1951 (rather poorly recorded) and Rudolf Schwarz with the Philharmonia in London in 1953. The wartime version is the most intense (and, in the first movement, the fastest), and the version under Furtwangler the most personal. All three versions include Joachim's first-movement cadenza, interestingly so in the case of van Kempen's recording which hails from Nazi Germany (Joachim was of course Jewish). Two versions of the E minor Mendelssohn Violin Concerto make for interesting comparisons, Furtwangler and Sargent this time, de Vito in the latter version, a superb performance, perfectly suggesting, at the start of the finale, an image that Aaron Rosand suggested to me many years ago of a rabbi and his student in gentle dialogue.

A stylish and sweetly expressive Mozart Third Concerto under Beecham and a sprightly stereo alternative with Kubelik, Brahms sonatas with a notably grand Edwin Fischer, and with Tito Aprea, sonatas by Beethoven, Brahms and Franck. …

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