Magazine article District Administration

An Assessment Solution That Provides Actionable Data on Progress and Readiness: eMPower Assessments by Measured Progress Focuses on Grades 3 through 8

Magazine article District Administration

An Assessment Solution That Provides Actionable Data on Progress and Readiness: eMPower Assessments by Measured Progress Focuses on Grades 3 through 8

Article excerpt

Mark Johnson,

Director, eMPower Product Development,

Measured Progress

eMPower Assessments[TM] by Measured Progress is a college and career readiness assessment program for grades 3 through 8. It is based on current research about what students need to know and be able to do for success beyond high school. With three assessment opportunities each year, eMPower provides a cohesive system of interim assessments to districts and a spring summative assessment for states that yields reliable accountability data to show growth over time. eMPower reports provide a direct predictive connection to the PS AT[TM] 8/9, a part of the SAT[R] Suite of Assessments.

eMPower Assessments provide an assessment solution for grades 3 through 8. Why is that important?

Preparing for college or career doesn't begin in high school. District leaders have told us that waiting for the PSAT in ninth grade to see if students are where they should be is too late. It's important to learn in the early grades whether students are gaining the knowledge, skills and abilities that will keep them on track for college and career. By third grade, state accountability tests usually begin, and most students read at a level where they can engage in assessments that provide meaningful results. We designed eMPower to help show whether students in grades 3 through 8 are on track for success.

What's the benefit of immediate reports for teachers?

Educators know that an assessment is a snapshot of a student's abilities at one point in time. With immediate results, teachers can address learning gaps right away and plan for efficient instruction. For example, teachers don't know at the beginning of the school year how much of the previous grade's material they need to review. It's really about giving teachers confidence that they know where students are on the standards trajectory and that their planned instruction is appropriate. …

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