Magazine article Artforum International

Martin Boyce: THE MODERN INSTITUTE

Magazine article Artforum International

Martin Boyce: THE MODERN INSTITUTE

Article excerpt

Staged to resemble a spacious domestic interior, Martin Boyce's exhibition "Light Years" expressed a poised interplay between standardized industrial materials and the refinement of high art. Three works that the artist compares to large Color Field landscape paintings (all works Untitled, 2017) anchored the overall installation. To create these, Boyce first applied beige primer to perforated steel panels, then layered on pale washes in rose, aqua, or yellow--colors selected from the German RAL system--yielding streaked and muted pastel fields. The effect is similar to that of the subtle ink-wash paintings of China, particularly the Song-dynasty landscapes of Ma Yuan, noted for his idiosyncratic vision and asymmetrical compositions. Ma would typically position the most significant element of his design--a branch, or a flower on a vine--off to one side, leaving the greater part of the surface empty, thereby providing a poetic, meditative ambience. Inspired by these "one corner" compositions, each of Boyce's paintings contains a form based on chain lanterns that extends in relief from one side. Constructed of industrial nickel-plated steel and blackened cast bronze, these elements recall Ma's natural forms, while the swaths of atmospheric space in each work leave room for the imagination. In the gallery, the felicitous play of natural light streaming through the windows lent a softening effect to the washed surfaces, which were animated by the ever-changing shadows cast by the metal reliefs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.