Magazine article The New American

John Foster Dulles: How This Early "Deep-Stater" Harmed America: John Foster Dulles-A Politician Following in His Family's Footsteps-Decided the World Needed Global Government, So He Worked to Achieve It, Including Backing Dictators

Magazine article The New American

John Foster Dulles: How This Early "Deep-Stater" Harmed America: John Foster Dulles-A Politician Following in His Family's Footsteps-Decided the World Needed Global Government, So He Worked to Achieve It, Including Backing Dictators

Article excerpt

Shortly after Adolf Hitler took power in Germany in 1933, some Englishmen were curious about this new political figure in central Europe, asking, "This Hitler fellow, where was he born?" To which Lady Astor replied, "At Versailles."

By that time, it was widely understood that the harsh peace imposed upon Germany after the First World War with the Treaty of Versailles--with loss of historic German territory; unreasonable reparations; and the hated Article 231, the "war guilt clause"--had given birth to Hitler. Some argue that the "war guilt clause" was perhaps the most onerous provision of the hated treaty. Under its provisions, the Germans were forced to admit that they, and they alone, were responsible for the Great War.

The person who drafted it was a young American lawyer, John Foster Dulles. The clause said, "Germany accepts the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damages to which the Allied and Associated governments and their nationals have been subjected as a consequence of the war imposed upon them by the aggression of Germany and her allies." (Emphasis added.)

It would not be the last time that an action of the then 31-year-old Dulles would lead to "blowback" on his country. In fact, famed journalist Alan Stang concluded in his book The Actor on the career of Dulles--the ultimate "deep stater"--"Dulles deliberately did more damage to America while masquerading as a conservative Republican anti-Communist, than Gus Hall [long-time head of the American Communist Party] could have imagined doing." Although the term was not in use at the time, John Foster Dulles and his brother Allen were key architects in the construction of what we now refer to as "the deep state"--the permanent state behind the visible government in D.C.

From his negative influence at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, until his death almost 40 years later while President Eisenhower's secretary of state, Dulles continued to create policies that damaged America. As Eisenhower's chief foreign policy advisor, his influence was immense. Stephen Kinzer wrote in his book on Dulles and his brother, Allen (director of the CIA), The Brothers, "On some days, Foster spoke personally or by telephone with Eisenhower as many as ten times. At dusk he often visited the White House for a chat over drinks."

Dulles' advice to Eisenhower was consistent with the views he held as a young lawyer: He was an ardent globalist (the term more used then was "internationalist") who believed military intervention was justified to achieve his desired globalist world order. And while Dulles occasionally peppered his resume with conservative, anti-communist rhetoric, it was, as Stang concluded in The Actor, all for temporary political cover until he could achieve what he and other insiders like him wanted: a world socialist government.

Dulles came to his dogged pursuit of a global government naturally, via family connections and by educational training. His grandfather, John Watson Foster, was secretary of state to President William Henry Harrison. A pillar of the post-Civil War Republican Party, Foster helped direct the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani of Hawaii by its American settlers and supported sending American troops to aid the rebels who declared themselves the new government. The Harrison administration ended before it could act on the new government's request for annexation (the next president, Grover Cleveland, quickly nixed the idea), but it did lay the foundation of the aggressive interventionism that would characterize Dulles' career in the 20th century.

His mother's sister married Robert Lansing, who replaced William Jennings Bryan as President Woodrow Wilson's secretary of state. Bryan had been pushed aside largely for his opposition to American entrance into the First World War, and replaced by Foster's Uncle Robert, who added his voice to Wilson's principal advisor, Colonel Edward M. …

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