Magazine article University Business

A Late Start Helps Students, Faculty Get Ahead

Magazine article University Business

A Late Start Helps Students, Faculty Get Ahead

Article excerpt

Community colleges bet on a wide variety of scheduling options to attract and retain students whose lives are already filled by jobs and families. Late-start courses that commence a few weeks after the semester begins are gaining popularity, as institutions discover this accelerated learning option supports both students and faculty.

At Roane State Community College in Tennessee, late-start classes serve unique student demographics, says Diana Ward, vice president for student learning. The 10-, seven- and five-week late-start courses offer "laser-focused" learning that works particularly well for students in the business and management schools, says Ward. For adjuncts and faculty who lose classes due to low enrollment, school deans can create a late-start section to satisfy teaching credit requirements.

The college doesn't allow anyone to join a class after the first day, but this option lets students maintain a full credit load if they choose to drop a course. There is a four-week registration period at the beginning of the semester for accelerated offerings such as lower-level math, speech and general ed classes. …

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