Magazine article Insight on the News

If You Can't Afford the Greenbrier Resort, Try the Plain Pipe-Rack Underground Shelter

Magazine article Insight on the News

If You Can't Afford the Greenbrier Resort, Try the Plain Pipe-Rack Underground Shelter

Article excerpt

It's only a short drive from the back of West Virginia's palatial Greenbrier resort to an ordinary-looking door marked "Danger High Voltage." Until 1992, when the Washington Post Magazine revealed that the door hid a nuclear-fallout shelter for members of Congress, not even most of the resort's 1,000-plus employees knew it existed. Once its location became known, the shelter had very little use.

Run under the code name of Project Greek Island, the shelter includes spartan rooms for lawmakers and their staffs along with two large auditoriums intended for the House and Senate. When operational, the shelter retained a 60-day supply of food, water and other necessities.

Since 1996, the resort has run the bunker as a special attraction, opening it to registered guests for tours at $20 a pop -- it even can be rented for special events. During its active life as a congressional shelter, the resort's seven "Television Repairmen" -- independent contractors -- worked to maintain it, coming and going through a push-away wall in the back of a workshop. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.