Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

There Is No Link between Vaccines and Autism

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

There Is No Link between Vaccines and Autism

Article excerpt

In 1998, The Lancet published a study by a doctor from the United Kingdom--Andrew Wakefield--that suggested that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine could trigger autism. This claim received massive media coverage, and the United States and the United Kingdom saw a subsequent and significant drop in immunization rates among children. In 2004, journalist Brian Deer reported that Wakefield had undisclosed conflicts of interest related to his study. In fact, Wakefield had applied for a patent on his own measles vaccine and had received money from a lawyer trying to sue companies that make the MMR vaccine. The Lancet then retracted the Wakefield study in 2010 after revealing additional concerns over ethics and misrepresentation in the study, and shortly thereafter, the United Kingdom's General Medical Council permanently pulled Wakefield's medical license. In the aftermath of this controversy, numerous studies have been conducted that have found no evidence that MMR causes autism, including a 2014 meta-analysis published in Vaccine for which the authors examined studies involving almost 1.3 million people. The Journal of the American Medical Association also reported that no difference existed in autism rates between thousands of vaccinated and unvaccinated children. …

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