Magazine article Dance Magazine

Older and Younger Dancers Celebrated in Colorado

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Older and Younger Dancers Celebrated in Colorado

Article excerpt

DENVER--When dancer Amy Anderson accepted an offer to take the helm of a new troupe at Colorado Ballet, she unknowingly set in motion a wave of change that would transform two Denver-based dance companies, spelling new beginnings for both. Anderson, also a choreographer and a physical therapist, retired from David Taylor Dance Theatre, where she had danced for a decade and had created several works for the company. She was tapped by Colorado Ballet artistic director Martin Fredmann to direct CB's new Dance Lab, a company of older dancers, inspired by the example of Netherlands Dance Theater 3.

Anderson's leaving DTDT was one in a season of many departures. Last year marked the greatest attrition Taylor had experienced since founding his company in 1978. Only three dancers from his original baker's dozen remained; other dancers retired or left owing to major injuries and career changes; two left to dance with other troupes. Replacing nearly the entire company was daunting. "Some people--Brent Kennedy, Anderson, and others--had been with me for ten years or more," says Taylor. There were advantages, however. Taylor says that in selecting the eleven new dancers he focused on their technical abilities, and that these talented performers will allow him to move toward "a new level of artistic excellence" and meet the challenges of the upcoming season.

In the spring, following a regional tour of Taylor's acclaimed multimedia production, Rainforest, the company will premiere the newest addition to their repertoire of classical and contemporary ballets: Glen Tetley's Mythical Hunters. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.