Magazine article Marketing

Small Talent but More Than a Bit Temperamental

Magazine article Marketing

Small Talent but More Than a Bit Temperamental

Article excerpt

I apologise if what follows is wrongly quoted but it certainly isn't misattributed, since I haven't the faintest idea who said it - though you may. It's a rather neat dismissal by a critic of some artistic effort or other. It runs "those who enjoy that sort of thing will enjoy this very much".

Anyhow, high on the list of things I enjoy is reading about the early days of pop music - especially when it involves unusually attractive people. This fascination recently led me to the autobiography of the dangerously sexy Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the Ronettes. She and her group were among the inspirations of the Beatles. Even if you're too young to remember the Ronettes, you recall them, don't you?

Describing her first tour in the early 60s, Ronnie tells some revealing stories about the temperamental aberrations of some of the big names, one of which stuck in my head because it destroyed forever my partiality for another artist of the period, Dusty Springfield. Apparently when in pre-concert mode sooty-eyed Springfield, rather than chew her nails, used to while away the time by throwing crockery at her dressing-room door. If there wasn't enough to hand, some poor minion had to go to the nearest store and buy more. This naturally made life difficult for other people on the tour, even if, compared with the antics of recent performers like the brothers Gallagher, she was a paradigm of old-world courtesy. Why do people who enjoy big reputations for a brief period become so conceited and behave so insanely? …

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