Magazine article ADWEEK

A Guide for Brands in a Partisan World: MARKETERS SHOULD CONSIDER THESE SIX MANAGEMENT PIVOTS BEFORE TAKING A STANCE ON A SOCIETAL ISSUE, OR NOT

Magazine article ADWEEK

A Guide for Brands in a Partisan World: MARKETERS SHOULD CONSIDER THESE SIX MANAGEMENT PIVOTS BEFORE TAKING A STANCE ON A SOCIETAL ISSUE, OR NOT

Article excerpt

I don't think Tim Mapes, chief marketing officer at Delta Air Lines, woke up on Jan. 1 this year with the idea that the new personification of the Delta brand in 2018 would be an unabashedly left-wing progressive.

I also don't think he had a standing meeting each week in 2017 scrutinizing each of the dozens of brand partnerships his airline established in order to repeatedly track their political leanings. He likely has a couple folks within his team that do a quick gut check for overall brand commensuration, and if the numbers work on a deal, they strike it.

But circumstances for CMOs have changed. I'd bet that on or around Feb. 23 this year, Mapes conducted a thorough audit of both of those topics (i.e., Delta's political persona and its various associations). He wasn't given a choice.

Delta and many other brands were unexpectedly dragged into the gun control debate. The survivors of the Stoneman Douglas massacre were making sure their voices reached large public podiums across the country and globe, and they very smartly recognized that some of the largest podiums on which to be heard were brands--major consumer brands that speak to millions of potential voters every single day.

On gun control and many other issues, marketing leaders are faced with making seemingly political decisions--something that until recently only a few brands made part of their mission, intentionally. Today, it isn't just Patagonia and Ben & Jerry's making statements on divisive issues; it's any brand with a connected and vocal consumer base.

So, what can apolitical marketing leaders do to protect their businesses and their customers in this era of "you're either with us or against us" politics? Here are six things to consider.

Focus on your enduring values

All brands honor a legacy and, whether or not they refer to them overtly, they likely live by a set of unwritten values. Some are timeless. Others appear and disappear based on leadership changes, company initiatives or societal progress. Values may be traced back to the origin of the company founders, or they may be the result of a yearly planning conversation. And if you're not already doing so, you need to bring your team together to discuss the present day relevance of your values and reaffirm those which are immutable.

Be consequence driven

Bring your leadership together and discuss the consequences of your words and actions, not just on quarterly profits, but on the health and well-being of your employees and customers. Workshop it out. Talk through outcomes. Talk to your customers about your planned actions. Project the results not just as you see them unfolding in the press the next morning, but in a way that is future focused. How will your decisions affect the business and the community in the next year, in the next 10 years and well past your own tenure in the organization? …

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