Magazine article Marketing

All Hail Dukie for Knifing the BBC's Worst Practices

Magazine article Marketing

All Hail Dukie for Knifing the BBC's Worst Practices

Article excerpt

You never can tell who is suddenly going to pop up as a hero. Often in war it is the quiet inoffensive person that no one has ever noticed before that does truly remarkable things. Who could imagine that it would be Lord Marmaduke Hussey, Dukie to friends and enemies alike, who would stick the knife into the BBC, three years after his decade as chairman ended?

The Lord Melvyn Bragg and the novelist and former BBC Governor PD James had telling points to make in the Lords debate on the future of public service broadcasting. But it was Dukie who quite rightly got the most attention and had the most impact.

If Dukie was in charge of the BBC for ten years, it is quite difficult to see how he could have had absolutely no responsibility for some of the current problems he identifies. Dukie, behaving like the perfect gent as always, says that in his last six months (when some of the big future issues such as digital and the bi-medial policy were coming down the tract) he thought it would be wrong to tie the hands of his successor. Sometimes you can be too polite.

Dukie had six main points to make. They were that: the BBC suffers from an overallotted policy unit and spends too much on external consultants; it devotes too much money to digital channels that hardly anyone can see; the idea that radio and television personnel should be interchangeable is crazy; if less money were spent on some of the above, there would be more money to spend on programmes in general and sports in particular; and programme makers need to be cherished. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.