Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Slow Going for Diversity in Tennessee

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Slow Going for Diversity in Tennessee

Article excerpt

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Tennessee's colleges and universities are making progress toward desegregation goals established 15 years ago, but in most instances the goals have not been met.

The figures were released late last month in the annual report of the committee that monitors compliance with the 1984 federal lawsuit settlement that established the goals.

The committee consists of members of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC), the Tennessee Board of Regents, and the University of Tennessee.

"We're pleased to report somewhat of an increase in enrollment and employment of African Americans, although not as significant as we would like," says Richard Rhoda, executive director of THEC.

The percentage of Black undergraduates enrolled at public colleges and universities in Tennessee in 1998 increased slightly to 16.91 percent of total enrollment, or 24,143 students. That was up from 16.39 percent in 1997, or 23,441 students.

Graduate student enrollment among Blacks also climbed slightly from 11.09 percent of total enrollment in 1997 to 11.79 percent, or 2,326 students, in 1998.

In 1998 there were 152 Black administrators, an increase of four from the previous year; 520 Black faculty members, an increase of three; and 579 Black staff professionals, an increase of 28. …

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