Magazine article Insight on the News

Holy Rock `N' Rollers

Magazine article Insight on the News

Holy Rock `N' Rollers

Article excerpt

A group of progressive pastors wants to use pop culture -- not fight it -- to make church relevant to youths. The text for their sermons is more likely to lie Star Wars than St. Matthews.

When it comes to shifts in popular culture, the people with their ears to the ground aren't always the advertisers, the musicians and the filmmakers. Sometimes they are ministers.

"The church is learning to pay attention at a faster rate," says Doug Pagitt, 32, an administrator with the Dallas-based Leadership Network. He and 150 youth pastors recently attended the "Ministry on the New Edge" conference in Maryland, where they focused on generation X and its younger siblings who inhabit a culture with a whole new take on religion -- one that is driven by pop culture.

No doubt that youth culture reigns at Cedar Ridge Community Church in Spencerville, Md., which hosted the conference. This spring, the church posted a marquee proclaiming a sermon series "God in the Movies" (The Truman Show, Amistad, The Apostle and Wag the Dog). The narthex immediately inside the front doors of the church is arranged like a spiritual Starbucks: Couches, chairs and tables beckon the visitor to sit awhile and partake of coffee and bagels on Sunday mornings. The church is filled with comfortable pine green chairs, amassed in front of a stage with no altar -- just a small, wooden cross.

Other churches are working to find ways to flow into the 21st century, as several young Turks of evangelical Christianity pointed out during the conference. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.