Magazine article Marketing

Sunny Delight May Be a Success, but It's Caused a Storm

Magazine article Marketing

Sunny Delight May Be a Success, but It's Caused a Storm

Article excerpt

Procter & Gamble must be pleased with the success of Sunny Delight,which Marketing's Biggest Brands survey last week revealed was the fastest-growing grocery brand launch of the 1990s. Whether it's pleased with the hostile reaction to its brand's success is another matter.

The national press were quick to follow up the survey, which reported that Sunny Delight now has UK sales of [pounds]160m. But the response from both the press and the food pressure groups was fiercely critical of how the brand is being marketed.

The P&G product came under fire for an advertising and retail campaign that seeks to position it as a healthy, vitamin-filled drink, despite the fact that it contains only 5% fruit juice and its main ingredients are water and sucrose.

'Unreal thing takes on the real thing', declared The Guardian, comparing it with Coca-Cola. 'Money Delight', said The Mirror, which also ran an article headed 'Sweet Nothing', by its medical correspondent,Jill Palmer, who warned:"Sunny Delight was launched as a healthy alternative to fizzy favourites, but in fact is mainly sugar and water."

The Daily Mail was probably the most cutting, with a headline that screamed 'Health row as "sugary water" sales hit [pounds]160m'. The Food Commission was also wheeled out to give its views, and declared: "The image comes across as a very healthy, fresh fruit-juice drink, and mums think it's good for their children. In fact,it is full of thickeners, colourings and flavourings to make it look like fruit juice, when it's just a very sugary drink. Basically it's just a marketing con. …

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