Magazine article Endangered Species Bulletin

Partners for Species Recovery

Magazine article Endangered Species Bulletin

Partners for Species Recovery

Article excerpt

With this issue of the Endangered Species Bulletin, I am reminded of the editorial, reprinted on the opposing page, that was written by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association's Executive Director, Syd Butler. His reflections on last year's anniversary of the Endangered Species Act and the future of the Wyoming toad (Bufo hemiophrys baxteri) speaks quite directly to the focus of this edition of the Bulletin.

The American Zoo and Aquarium Association and its nearly 200 member institutions have been partners in the conservation and recovery of endangered species with the Fish and Wildlife Service for a long time. Some of those partnerships have been extraordinarily critical. They provided the crucial opportunity to turn species such as the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), red wolf (Canis rufus), and black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) from almost certain extinction toward recovery. Though these efforts deserve our highest praise and appreciation, they are, as Syd points out, only part of the story. The whole story includes the efforts to save dozens and dozens of smaller, less well known species that have become imperiled by human activities.

The choice of the Wyoming toad for the cover of the AZA's March 1998 issue of Communique pleased me as well. When I look at the list of more than 1,100 species of plants and animals protected by the Endangered Species Act, it is easy to pick out the "popular" species, the ones that most people know. Feathered or furred, they are the stars of many nature documentaries and magazine covers. …

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