Magazine article The New American

VOTER FRAUD: Manipulating the Vote: An Investigation of the 2016 Election Is Ongoing-Despite Zero Proof That Donald Trump Worked with the Russians-Yet Real Dangers to Our Elections Remain Unaddressed

Magazine article The New American

VOTER FRAUD: Manipulating the Vote: An Investigation of the 2016 Election Is Ongoing-Despite Zero Proof That Donald Trump Worked with the Russians-Yet Real Dangers to Our Elections Remain Unaddressed

Article excerpt

A casual observer who watches only mainstream-media news coverage might reasonably conclude that American elections are in grave danger from external hackers, that the principal source of such hackers is Russia, and that the principal beneficiary of such election hacking is Donald Trump. Nothing could be further from the truth. There is no evidence that Russian hackers changed the vote count on election day. In fact, this is not even the claim, which is that Russia was responsible for the leaked DNC e-mails and manipulated social media on behalf of Trump. That said, American elections have had integrity problems having absolutely nothing to do with foreign intervention, but these election frauds have been known for years.

So the question is, "Why the sudden controversy regarding elections, and why is the sudden media attention mistakenly focusing on outside hackers while ignoring the greater danger of the inside job in election fraud?"

Much of the current Russian hacker controversy can be traced to the 2016 presidential campaign trail, when candidate Donald Trump was making a facetious point regarding Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's careless lack of proper safeguarding of classified information on her email servers. Responding to charges from Clinton and the media that he is chummy with Putin, Trump, during a nationally televised campaign address, asked in frustration: "What would I have to get involved with Putin for? I have nothing to do with Putin. I've never spoken to him. I don't know anything about him." Then, in what was obviously a facetious dig not only at Hillary Clinton but also at President Barack Obama and the FBI/DOJ, which were supposed to be investigating Hillary's e-mail scandal (but were instead giving her a free pass), candidate Trump said: "Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing."

The Clinton campaign immediately feigned outrage and charged that Trump's sarcastic comment was itself proof of collusion with Russia. "This has to be the first time that a major presidential candidate has actively encouraged a foreign power to conduct espionage against his political opponent," the Clinton campaign said in a widely quoted press statement. Wolf Blitzer and Jim Acosta, two of CNN's anti-Trump commentators, immediately called the Trump comment "astonishing" and "jaw-dropping," giving credence to Team Clinton's spin on the matter. The New York Times, PBS, and the rest of the establishment media, likewise, took what was clearly a mocking comment and transformed it into a treasonous comment.

The Russian Hacker Conspiracy

On multiple occasions during the election cycle, Hillary repeated the accusation that the Russians were conspiring to aid Trump. Then when Trump won the election, virtually every major-media personality glommed onto the claim, doing their utmost to discredit Trump's victory and set him up for impeachment. But the entire theory verges on inanity.

The "Russian interference" meme regarding the 2016 presidential elections is actually a tangled complex of wild conspiracy theories by the same folks who regularly deride conspiracy facts as "crazy conspiracy theory." The most ludicrous and easily disprovable claim of Russian hacking and Russian collusion is the charge that Russians somehow hacked our voting machines and changed votes across the country. There has been no evidence offered to show this has happened. For this to have happened nationwide, with the many types of voting system technologies, it would have to have involved a major conspiracy. The accusers need to present evidence.

Though it is possible that some voting equipment has Internet access, either wireless or by direct electrical connection, during the voting or the processing of election results before the results are made public, allowing hacking, it's not only unlikely, but such questions do not appear to have been answered. …

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