Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Two Sides to Every Issue

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Two Sides to Every Issue

Article excerpt

I am dismayed and disappointed by the one-note coverage in the E&P stories on the harassment and firing of Denver Post Editor Dennis Britton [Sept. 18, p. 32, and Sept. 4, p. 8]. I worked as a Denver Post reporter for two years before resigning Dec. 31, 1998. During that time, Britton and I had occasion to disagree. But you know what? He had good news judgment. He was direct. He was blunt. He was decisive. He was hard-working and competitive and aggressive. I liked that, and I liked working for him. So did lots of my co-workers.

Yes, Britton did trim lots of deadwood after taking the editor's job three years ago. Most of the time, when a new manager comes in, there are staffing changes, either voluntary or forced. A few people just didn't want to work in the new environment, or under Britton's guidance. And then there were some lazy, entitlement-minded, combative people who brought their personal issues to work. Britton fired them. One was a friend of mine.

Denver is an incredibly competitive, fast-paced place for journalists. Britton needed workers, not prima donnas. And fired prima donnas can get very, very angry. Fired, smarting over it, and with plenty of time on their hands, these people didn't move on. Instead, they sent pizzas to the newsroom, faxed bogus press releases, blah blah blah. …

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