Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Concussion/TBI Linked to Suicide Risk, Meta-Analysis Suggests

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Concussion/TBI Linked to Suicide Risk, Meta-Analysis Suggests

Article excerpt

FROM JAMA NEUROLOGY

RISK OF SUICIDE WAS doubled in persons who experienced a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) earlier in life, according to results of a meta-analysis of 17 studies representing nearly 7 million patients.

However, the absolute risk of suicide remained quite low, according to Michael Fralick, MD, of the University of Toronto, and co-investigators.

"Nearly all patients diagnosed with concussion and/or mild TBI did not die by suicide," Dr. Fralick and colleagues said in their report on the study, which appears in JAMA Neurology.

Nevertheless, the meta-analysis illustrates evidence for an increased risk of suicide, suicide attempts, and suicidal ideation for persons with a history of these injuries, they said in the report.

The meta-analysis included 10 cohort studies, 5 cross-sectional studies, and 2 case-control studies looking at the risk of suicide, suicide attempts, or suicidal ideation after a concussion or mild TBI. Those studies included a roughly 714,000 individuals with a concussion and / or TBI diagnosis, and 6,236,000 without a diagnosis.

For people diagnosed with at least one concussion and/or mild TBI, the risk of suicide was 2-fold higher (relative risk, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.47-2.80; P less than 0.001), according to the report.

The risk was "slightly stronger," investigators said, when the analysis was limited to studies adjusting for factors associated with those brain injuries and with suicide (RR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.40-3.13; P less than 0. …

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