Magazine article Artforum International

Miguel Angel Campano

Magazine article Artforum International

Miguel Angel Campano

Article excerpt

In the late '60s and early '70s, a group of young figurative painters living in Madrid--Guillermo Perez Villalta, Manolo Quejido, Carlos Alcolea, and Rafael Perez Minguez, among others--emerged as a generation of artists who freely mixed intellectual gamesmanship and art-historical references with veiled autobiographical allusions and an often strong psychoanalytic component. Although they enjoyed much critical support, they are, thirty years later, something of a "lost generation." Perhaps because their work was so conceptual and laden with personal references, it had little influence on the artists of the '80s, though there are some affinities (for example, the use of autobiographical elements and an interest in psychoanalysis).

Born in 1948, Miguel Angel Campano is one of the younger members of that lost generation. His work makes constant reference to the history of painting and contains a strong, if cryptic, autobiographical component. However, his influences are not those of a Pop artist. A great admirer of the American Abstract Expressionists, Campano has often explored the tension between figuration and abstraction. In the early '80s, he painted a series entitled "Vocales," inspired by a Rimband poem, in which clear references to AbEx emerge.

Later in the '80s, Campano moved away from abstraction and took up the legacies of Cezanne, Poussin, and Delacroix, with several series of landscapes painted "after" the masters. As the decade drew to a close, however, Campano began increasingly to purge the figure from his work, a progression most clearly manifested, perhaps, in the series "Ruth y Booz," 1989-93. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.