Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Now That's Old School

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Now That's Old School

Article excerpt

An editorial in the July 1974 issue of Parks & Recreation magazine titled "The Movement Without a Name" epitomized the mood and passion of an era that both strove to rectify the rights of all people and attempted to preserve the environment. The goals of the park and recreation profession mirrored the nation's growing social and environmental consciousness. Park and recreation professionals, for example, created programs that included minorities and those with disabilities. Park planners designed parks and facilities to preserve energy and alleviate pollution in cities.

The author of the editorial writes, "[T]he signs of the times suggest a new role for the park and recreation movement in our society ... the park and recreation movement lacks an adequate word or phrase to define its mission. Is it comfortable to describe programs for the ill and handicapped that bring rich alternatives for self-fulfillment to many people who cannot share the satisfactions of the world of work as being part of a new `leisure ethic.' If recreation is redefined to take in such diverse elements as wilderness parks and the sense of achievement that comes from volunteer work in a hospital, what assurance is there that the special role of parks in defining mankind's relationship with nature will not be lost? How can the description of the park and recreation movement adequately express its commitment to deal forthrightly with such knotty social problems as juvenile delinquency, drugs, and vandalism? Prison reform, the regulation of subdivision development, air and water quality standards, urban transportation, the preservation of historic buildings and places, reading to the blind, lifetime sports ... are, in fact, the diversities of the park and recreation movement. To broaden the choices available to people and enlarge their freedom to choose -- these are our goals. To articulate this movement to the public and to enlist their commitment is our challenge."

The following list shows how the National Recreation and Park Association and the park and recreation profession mirrored the nation's strides to be inclusive and progressive in their reform movements.

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