Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Supreme Court Rules against Labor in Job Contracts Case

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Supreme Court Rules against Labor in Job Contracts Case

Article excerpt

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that job contracts do not have to spell out that workers are not obligated to become full union members as a condition of employment.

It is not a breach of a union's duty of fair representation for its contracts to include the "union security clause" from the National Labor Relations Act, the court held Nov. 2 in Marquez vs. Screen Actors Guild. The language of the clause says workers must become union members within 30 days of being hired.

The court limited that provision in two prior rulings. In National Labor Relations Board vs. General Motors, it held that paying initiation fees and dues suffices as membership.

In Communications Workers vs. Beck, it ruled workers cannot be forced to pay for union activities unrelated to collective bargaining, grievance adjustment or contract administration.

In the SAG decision, the court rejected Naomi Marquez's contention that her employment contract should have explained those two rulings.

Marquez, an actress, was chosen for a one-day part on a TV show, but didn't get it because she couldn't afford the union's $500 initiation fee. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.