Magazine article Dance Magazine

Off the Grid: Why Some Artists Abstain from Sharing Online

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Off the Grid: Why Some Artists Abstain from Sharing Online

Article excerpt

When Joffrey Ballet dancer Rory Hohenstein first created an Instagram account, the choice to make it private was merely incidental. This was before the platform became such a powerful tool for self-promotion in the dance world, and he was concerned about strangers having an inside look at his life and younger dancers seeing him use the occasional curse word. Years later, he still hasn't gone public, and has come to value Instagram as a place where he can stay in touch with friends and family or relive favorite memories, not as a tool to advance his career.

Though social media has become a powerful way for dancers and choreographers to connect with audiences, land gigs and promote their work, not everyone is taking part.

Choreographer Danielle Agami abstains from social media completely, citing her general ideological opposition to the platforms. "I feel a lot of sorrow for people who are buried under this idea that social media is going to decide their future or the amount of love they might experience," she says. "I know I don't miss anything by not participating in that." Agami feels that social media distracts from the artistic process of choreographers, and says that she gets the gigs she does because she's always "working hard in the studio instead of being on Facebook." But she has the advantage of having someone to run the accounts for her company, Ate9, which she says she never looks at.

Many dancers use Instagram to forge a deeper relationship with audiences, posting about their touring schedule, cross-training routine and injury recovery. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.