Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Microsoft Showcases Computerized Home without the Computer

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Microsoft Showcases Computerized Home without the Computer

Article excerpt

REDMOND, Wash. -- Imagine coming home and having your house say hello.

No, the house doesn't actually come out and say it. Instead, after it scans your retina on the porch, it unlocks the door for you. Once inside the lights come up, the blinds open and your favorite aria filters through the speakers.

From there, you can dial up your phone messages and e-mail on your TV, pipe the music into the kitchen while you cook dinner and look up a recipe over the Internet. If a music CD or DVD movie is loaded, you can enjoy it from any room in the house.

Home networking is not a new concept. Small companies like X10 and large ones like IBM offer the hardware and software necessary to automate and computerize a home. But it's expensive, and requires a powerful home computer or expensive computerized hub to run it all.

Microsoft Corp., however, has designed a networked home that doesn't need a computer.

"Every device in here has just enough of a brain to recognize every other device," says Stacy Elliot, spokeswoman for the Microsoft Home.

Microsoft believes the greatest benefit from its networking concept comes because a computer isn't necessary. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.