Magazine article The Christian Century

Ecclesial Protest

Magazine article The Christian Century

Ecclesial Protest

Article excerpt

GETTING ARRESTED, as advocates for gays and lesbians did at the United Methodist General Conference in Cleveland this month, has become a banal form of protest. Incidents of civil disobedience are now jointly orchestrated by participants and police so they can be carried out with minimum fuss. In Cleveland, the police helpfully pointed out where the protesters needed to stand so they could be arrested for impeding public access. The protesters garnered publicity for their cause and everyone made it home for a late dinner.

We're glad, of course, that such confrontations are peaceful, and that the police didn't bring out dogs and water cannons to round up protesters, as they did in the Deep South during the civil rights movement of the 1950s. But there's a crucial element of civil disobedience as it was originally practiced that seems to be ignored or forgotten these days: the aim of civil rights demonstrators was not to break the law and thereby call attention to their cause, but to break an unjust law and thereby call attention to the law's unjustness. That's why they chose to break the laws enforcing segregation of lunch counters, swimming pools and buses. That's why in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" Martin Luther King Jr. took seriously his critics' charge that the movement was being cavalier about the law, and argued at length that indeed laws should be obeyed--except when a law violates God's law.

The protesters in Cleveland, we assume, were not morally opposed to Cleveland's laws on public access. Indeed, their quarrel is not with the civil law at all, but with church law, as codified in the United Methodists' Book of Discipline. …

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