Magazine article Sunset

Italian Dinner Rolls Taste like Breadsticks and Look like ... We're Not Too Sure

Magazine article Sunset

Italian Dinner Rolls Taste like Breadsticks and Look like ... We're Not Too Sure

Article excerpt

Italian dinner rolls taste like breadsticks and look like . . . we're not too sure

Have they grown legs--or petals? In Italy, these whimsical dinner rolls are dubbed garofani, or carnations. We call our modified version breadstick rolls. Their unruly appendanges have the taste and crusty texture of breadsticks; their centers are soft and chewy.

The dough--and the way you shape and bake it--gives these rolls their distinctive features. The dough resembles modeling clay; it's stiffer than what you may be accustomed to, because it contains more flour. That consistency, however, maintains shape and gives the bread a somewhat denser texture. You cut the firm dough to make a fringed strip, then roll it up. The cut surfaces open up and become crisply crusted when baked.

Cook these rolls at a high temperature and spray intermittently with water to obtain a hard, shiny surface. Since it takes a few minutes to shape each pan of rolls, you can bake pans in sequence if you have only one oven.

These rolls are best freshly baked. If made more than 8 hours ahead, freeze, then thaw and reheat later.

Italian Breadstick Rolls

1 package active dry yeast

2 cups warm water (110|)

6 1/4 to 6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 cup olive oil or salad oil

2 teaspoons salt, or to taste

In a large bowl, sprinkle yeast over the water; let stand about 5 minutes. Add 3 cups of the flour, oil, and salt. Beat with a dough hook or a mixer on low speed until flour is incorporated, then beat on high speed until dough is shiny, satiny, and stretchy, 4 to 6 minutes.

Add 2 cups flour.

If using a dough hook, beat dough on low speed until flour is incorporated, then beat on high speed until dough is smooth, 3 to 5 minutes. Gradually and another 1 1/4 cups flour, beating until flour is incorporated (if dough becomes too heavy for the machine, scrape dough onto a board and knead in remaining flour). Turn dough onto a floured board, and knead, adding flour if required, until dough is smooth, dense, firm, and nonsticky, with a feel similar to modeling clay, about 5 minutes.

If using a mixer, now switch to a heavy spoon and stir in as much flour as possible. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.