Magazine article E Magazine

The Color of Money

Magazine article E Magazine

The Color of Money

Article excerpt

I just read some incredible nonsense written by Jerry Taylor of the Cato Institute, a conservative Washington think tank. Taylor notes that the major media gave Earth Day a miss (though fails to acknowledge why: the feeding frenzy over Elian Gonzalez). "Earth Day came and went and it seems that hardly anyone noticed," Taylor writes, adding, "Make no mistake: There is no joy in Green-ville."

Let me get this straight. The media infect the public with Elian fever, ignore Earth Day completely, and Taylor concludes from this that "hardly anyone noticed"? Actually, there were successful Earth Day events all over the world, and they did get a good deal of coverage from local media (apparently unaware they were supposed to be staging a boycott). I know because I celebrated Earth Day outside the Beltway, at Illinois State University in Bloomington. The hard work of a dedicated group of students and faculty resulted in a very successful celebration on the green.

Want more proof that there's life in the good old environmental movement? Take a look at green business, the subject of Jennifer Bogo's cover story in this issue. Scratch an American shopper today and you're likely to uncover an environmentally aware consumer. An incredible 70 percent of them say that a product or package's recyclability affects their decision to buy it. The 1996 "Green Gauge" by the Roper polling organization reveals that 45 percent of Americans have bought products because the label said it was environmentally safe or biodegradable. Some 54 percent could recall seeing TV commercials or magazine ads for environmental products, and 67 percent recalled seeing green labels on products or packages. …

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